TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE
ARCH 1311 Design Environment and Society
College of Architecture Homepage 

Urs Peter "Upe" Flueckiger, Professor
Office Hours: T/W  12:00noon 01:00PM or by appointment

Syllabus Fall 2018

COURSE ORGANIZATION
Tuesday 08:00 - 09:20AM Media & Communication  Bldg. Room 281
Thursday 08:00 - 09:20AM Media & Communication  Bldg. Room 281
ARCH 1311 DES Academic Calendar Fall 2018     Electronic Reserve, Required Readings  
 
ANSWER OF QUESTION 49 FROM THE BOOK ABOVE:

What is architecture?


Short answer:
The built image of ourselves.

Long answer:
In a world of fluid, virtual values, architecture endures. The images that you , your work, your city, and your country create by building will more likely outlive you. Buildings are the most important traces we leave  behind as people. Old ones were here long before we arrived and new ones we make will be here long after we're gone. Architecture is a collective selfie. It's a status that can't be updated.
 

From:
 Waern, Rasmus. & Wingardh Gert. What is Architecture? and 100 other Questions. Laurence King Publishing LDT, 2015.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
[ARCH 1311] (3:3:0) Introduction to architecture as an integral component of a complex world. Examination of societal and environmental contexts and appropriate design responses. Fulfills Core Social and Behavioral Sciences - Individual or Group Behavior requirement. F. Other names this course is known by: Design, Environment, And Society.

ARCH 1311 satisfies the Texas Tech University core curriculum requirement in social and behavioral sciences.

The objective of a social and behavioral science component of a core curriculum is to increase the student's knowledge of how social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events, and ideas. Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity.

Students graduating from Texas Tech University should be able to demonstrate the ability to assess critically claims about social issues, human behavior, and diversity in human experiences.

Graduate and Student Assistants Email Address
Romina Cardiello
Off. Hrs. Arch. Lib. 8th fl. 
Tue. 12:30-2:30PM
Section A romina.cardiello@ttu.edu 
Addison Cundiff
Off. Hrs. Arch. Lib. 8th fl.
Tue/Thurs. 02:00-03:00PM
Section B addison.cundiff@ttu.edu
Taylor Hanttula
Off. Hrs. Arch. Lib. 8th fl.
Tue/Thurs. 09:30-11:00AM
Section C taylor.hanttula@ttu.edu
Arezoo Kayal
Off. Hrs. Arch. Lib. 8th fl.
Mo. 4:30-5:30PM
Tue. 5:00-6:00PM
Section D arezoo.kayal@ttu.edu
Matthew Roye
Off. Hrs. Arch. Lib. 8th fl.
Mo. 1:00-3:00PM
Section E matthew.roye@ttu.edu
Isaac Arzate
Off. Hrs. Arch. Lib. 8th fl.
Mo. 12:00-1:00PM
We 12:00-1:00PM
Section F isaac.arzate@ttu.edu
Marissa Williams
Off. Hrs. Arch. Lib. 8th fl.
Tue/Thurs. 4:00-5:00PM
Section G marissa.l.williams@ttu.edu
     

COURSE STRUCTURE
ARCH 1311 Design Environment and Society is an introductory class which meets twice a week and is held in the lecture format. Course content will be presented in lectures. This course will study design not as an isolated independent discipline, but as an integrated part of a much larger and complex world. Among the more important components of this world are the societies of people among whom we live and the environment within which we dwell. 

This course will introduce the concepts of architecture, design, society and environments, illustrate the value of design as it relates to society and the environment, and demonstrates how design is influenced by environmental and societal considerations. This course will address the following from the 2014 Guide to Student Performance Conditions published by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB).

2014 NAAB CONDITIONS ADDRESSED IN ARCH 1311:
NAAB stand for The National Architectural Accrediting Board. Their 2014 NAAB Conditions need to be met in order to be NAAB accredited program.

A.1. Professional Communication Skills: Ability to write and speak effectively and use representational media appropriate for both within the profession and with the general public.
(Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board THECB Communication http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/ )

A. 2. Design Thinking Skills: Ability to raise clear and precise questions, use abstract ideas to interpret information, consider diverse points of view, reach well-reasoned conclusions, and test alternative outcomes against relevant criteria and standards. (THECB Critical Thinking)

A. 7. History and Global Culture: Understanding of the parallel and divergent histories of architecture and the cultural norms of a variety of indigenous, vernacular, local, and regional settings in terms of their political, economic, social, ecological, and technological factors. (THECB Social Responsibility) 

D. 1. Stakeholder Roles in Architecture: Understanding of the relationships among key stakeholders in the design process client, contractor, architect, user groups, local community and the architect's role to reconcile stakeholder needs.
(THECB Social Responsibility)


EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES AND LEARNING OUTCOMES
To critically introduce architecture in its rich variety.

To understand the various methods used observe human behavior for research purposes. (THECB Empirical and Quantitative Skills)

To understand the process of gathering, organizing, and analyzing research data for purposes of understanding the ways in which humans perceive space and react to space. (THECB Empirical and Quantitative Skills)

To understand how humans perceive, react to, and behave in public, social, and private space. (THECB Social Responsibility)

To understand how architecture is part of the greater society and how architecture affects human behavior within built environment. The College of Architecture at TTU Demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate and ethical methods, technologies, and data that social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.

To recognize and understand the cultural genesis of major architectural movements.
(THECB Social Responsibility)

To understand basic architectural theoretical concepts of space and its relationship to human behavior. The College of Architecture at TTU Demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate and ethical methods, technologies, and data that social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.

To identify the quality or non-quality of an architectural or design object/idea/concept. (THECB Social Responsibility; The College of Architecture at TTU Demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate and ethical methods, technologies, and data that social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.) 

To beginning to develop the ability of giving/taking feedback (critique) to/from fellow students graduate/undergraduate assistants and the instructor, without taking it personally. (THECB Social Responsibility; The College of Architecture at TTU knowledge of appropriate ethical methods)

COURSE STRUCTURE
The course is composed of two interrelated segments with lectures given by the professor and occasional guest lecturers:

Part One: 
Introduction to Architectural Theory
Typology, Architectural Types, City and the Urban Environment
The Context of Architecture
Stakeholders in Architecture
The Tectonic, Materials and Prefabrication
Architectural, Social and Cultural Movements in the 20th Century to the present
Architectural Drawing and Representation

Part Two: 
The relationship between social behaviors and architecture
Space, and the concept of space in architecture and human social interactions
Sustainable Design 
The information age and design for a networked society
Diversity, feminism and multi-ethnic power and presence in the world
The practice of architecture in a changing context.
The understanding of public, social, and personal spaces in nonwestern culture

The course instructor will lecture on each Tuesday and Thursday.

NOTEBOOK/SKETCHBOOK
Each student must purchase Sketchbook/Notebook in which to lecture notes, sketches, drawings etc., and these must be kept in chronological order in organized sections. We will use the sketchbook/notebook for ARCH 1311 DES but for those of you who are enrolled in ARCH 1301 Design Studio I you will use the same sketchbook/notebook. Your sketchbook can be purchased at Varsity Bookstore on 1305 University Ave. Lubbock, TX 79401 Your Sketchbook/Notebook will be evaluated at the end of the semester and be part of your final grade. 

LECTURES
Lectures will meet promptly each Tuesday and Thursday from 8:00 to 9:20AM in the
Media & Communication  Building Room 281. This means you must be in your seat and prepared to begin before 3:30PM. Seating for the lectures will be assigned sections. Students will be counted absent if their seat is unoccupied at any time during the class period. Do not bring food and drink into class. Also remove any headgear on entering the classroom. Please turn of your cell phone/Smart Phones and pager prior to entering the classroom. The use of cell phones and other electronic devices during class is not permitted unless when addressed otherwise.

QUIZZES
There will be periodic, unannounced quizzes throughout the semester. Quizzes may cover the material from the lectures or from assigned readings. Answers to quizzes must be handed in on the questionnaire form handed out on the day, and not on paper torn from a note pad.

ASSIGNMENTS
Assignments must be completed on time. Late submissions will not be graded or at the least it will result in a deduction of your grade. This is a design school and the quality of your work is of paramount importance. You must do the best work possible.

GENERAL METHODS

CLASS CULTURE
Expect to spend a significant amount of time working on your class projects outside of class time. In class contact time is 2 times 1 hour 40 minutes. The outside time is expected to be a minimum of 2 times the class contact time. It is strongly suggested that you get into the habit of working in the studio after hours. 

ASSIGNMENTS
All assignments are due at the specific time and period listed in the calendar . Assignments submitted late without prior knowledge of the instructor will receive an F. Late assignments will only be accepted with prior written permission from your instructor, or, in the case of an emergency, telephone permission followed by a written statement, or with proper documentation as required by current University policy. However any late submission will have a drop of at least one letter grade or more.

ATTENDANCE
The class will meet promptly each T/R 8:00 to 9:20AM in the Mass Communication Building Room 281. Four absences will result in a student receiving a W, WF or an F for the class. You, the student, must bear the responsibility for keeping track of your own attendance. Absence policies are described on page 75-76 of the University Catalogue. 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES and ASSESSMENT METHODS

 

COA TTU STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVE

ASSESSMENT METHODS

1. Identify and Critique alternative explanations for claims about social issues and human behavior.

  • Students are exposed to different theories about and approaches to the relationship between human culture, natural environment, the architectural design process and architectural theory
  • Assessed through evaluation of student projects and performance on examinations and quizzes.

2. Demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate and ethical methods, technologies, and data that social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.

  • Discussion of the responsibility of architects to clients and the general public/user. Sources of data and instruction on how social, economic, and cultural data is used in the design process.
  • Assessed through evaluation of student projects and performance on examinations and quizzes.

COLLEGE-LEVEL COMPETENCY

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Students graduating from Texas Tech University should be able to: demonstrate the ability to assess critically claims about social issues, and human behavior, in human experiences.

  • Design reflects differing approaches to human visions of their relationship with place in nature, cultural traditions, economic systems, architectural theories and many other variables. Students are exposed to the need to consider these variables in developing architectural designs and to critically evaluate different design approaches and theories.
  •  Assessed through the student project.

THECB OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT METHODS

1. Critical Thinking Skills: to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of information

  • Students are exposed to critical thinking throughout this course. Specifically, they are asked to raise clear and precise questions, use abstract ideas to interpret information, consider diverse points of view, reach well-reasoned conclusions, and test alternative outcomes against relevant criteria and standards, all in the context of learning about the conditions that must be considered in developing effective architectural designs.
  • Assessment is though the student project as well as performance on examinations and class participation (discussion).

 

2. Communication Skills: to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication.

  •  Information about architectural designs is communicated by way of written, oral, and visual communication.
  • Students in ARCH 1311 learn to master these communication methods through class participation and the student projects, which require all the above communication methods.

3. Empirical and Quantitative Skills: to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions

  •  Students must be able to interpret a wide range of data presented in quantitative form in order to create effective architectural design. They also must now how to calculate scale and what different scales reveal (or conceal) about a design.
  • Assessed mainly through the student project.

4. Social Responsibility: to include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities

  • Architects have a responsibility to society to ensure that the structures and other types of built environments are structurally sound, adapted to their specific natural and cultural environments, and are efficient energy consumers. Architects also must maintain ethical relationships with clients. Finally, architects must be familiar with built environments from many different parts of the world, constructed by culturally different people, and dedicated to different purposes. These topics are all covered in this course.
  • Assessment is largely through student performance on examinations.



LEARNING OUTCOMES:

To understand the basic components of what makes good architecture and what does not.

To understand how architecture is part of the greater society and how can shape its environment.

To recognize and understand major architectural movements and their creators.

To understand and comprehend basic architectural and theoretical components.

To understand how architecture is part of the greater society and how architecture affects human behavior within built environment.

To recognize and understand the cultural genesis of major architectural movements.

To understand basic architectural theoretical concepts of space and its relationship to human behavior.

To understand the various methods used observe human behavior for research purposes.

To understand the process of gathering, organizing, and analyzing research data for purposes of understanding the ways in which humans perceive space and react to space.

To understand how humans perceive, react to, and behave in public, social, and private space.

GRADES
Final grades will be calculated according to the following schedule:
Midterm exam 15%,
Notebook/Sketchbook 10%
Assignments 60% Discussion/Participation, and Preparation
Final Examination 15%

TOTAL 100%

PROJECT GRADING
Grading is a certification that the student has clearly demonstrated a level of expertise as required in each design project or exercise. 

"A" indicates that the level of expertise is superior (excellent work.) 

"B" indicates the project task or problem is clearly resolved but lacks in-depth study or resolution in one or two areas. 

"C" indicates the level of work is satisfactory; perhaps somewhat mediocre. 

"D" indicates the level of expertise is minimal and weak. (This is a passing grade for the University; however, a minimum grade of "C" is required to proceed to the next design level.) 

"F" grade indicates a failure to respond adequately 

Plus and minus marks may be used to indicate higher and lower ratings in each grade division for the purposes of averaging progress reports and final grades. A student who has shown her or his clear successful improvement throughout the semester may be given the advantage in the case of borderline final grade averages.

GRADE EQUIVALENCES

A+= 98-100 B+= 87-89 C+= 77-79 D= 65-69
A= 94-97 B= 84-86 C= 74-76 F= Below 65
A-= 90-93 B-= 80-83 C-= 70-73  


STUDENT WORK
The College of Architecture reserves the rights to retain, exhibit, and reproduce work submitted by students. Work submitted for grade is the property of the college and remains as such until it is returned to the student. For exhibition purposes keep all material available for the instructor at the end of semester. 

READINGS
Excerpts from the following books required reading for this course:

Alberti, Leon Battista. On the Art of Building in Ten Books. The MIT Press,1991.
Conrads, Ulrich. Programs and Manifestoes on 20th-century Architecture. The MIT Press, 1971.
Hall, Edward, T. The Hidden Dimension. Anchor,1990.
Kruft
, Hanno-Walter. A History of Architectural Theory, From Vitruvius to the Present. Princeton Architectural Press, 1994.
Le Corbusier. Towards a New Architecture. Dover Publication, 1984.
Koolhaas, Rem. S,M,L,XL. Monacelli Press, NY, 1995.
Nelson, George. How to See: A Guide to our Manmade Environment. Little, Brown and Company, 1979.
Mau Bruce. Leonard, Jennifer. Massive Change. Phaidon, 2004.
Palladio, Andrea. The Four Books of Architecture. Dover Publications,1965.
Rasmussen, Steen Eiler. Experiencing Architecture. The MIT Press; later Printing edition. 1964.
Rybczynski, Witold. Home: 
A Short History of an Idea. Penguin (Non-Classics), 1987.
Rybczynski, Witold. The Look of Architecture. Oxford University Press, USA, 2003.
Rybczynski, Witold. The Perfect House: A Journey with the Renaissance Master. Scribner New York, NY 2002.
Tufte, Edward. Envisioning Information. Graphics Press. 1990.
Vitruvius, Marcus Polio. (Author), 
The Ten Books on Architecture (Bks. I-X). Dover Publications, 1960. 
Venturi, Robert. Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture. The Museum of Modern Art, NY 1966.
Waern, Rasmus. & Wingardh Gert. What is Architecture? and 100 other Questions. Laurence King Publishing LDT, 2015.
Whyte William H. The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces. Project for Public Spaces Inc, 2001.


ACCOMMODATIONS
ADA Syllabus Statement
Any student who, because of a disability, may require special arrangements in order to meet the course requirements should contact the instructor as soon as possible to make any necessary arrangements. Students should present appropriate verification from Student Disability Services during the instructor's office hours. Please note instructors are not allowed to provide classroom accommodations to a student until appropriate verification from Student Disability Services has been provided. For additional information, you may contact the Student Disability Services office in 335 West Hall or 806-742-2405 begin.

CLASS CULTURE

Texas Tech University College of Architecture

Class Culture Policy

April 1, 2009

3.5 Class Culture 
The school is expected to demonstrate a positive and respectful learning environment through the encouragement of the fundamental values of optimism, respect, sharing, engagement, and innovation between and among the members of its faculty, student body, administration, and staff. The school should encourage students and faculty to appreciate these values as guiding principles of professional conduct throughout their careers.

The APR must demonstrate that the school has adopted a written studio culture policy with a plan for its implementation and maintenance and provide evidence of abiding by that policy. The plan should specifically address issues of time management on the part of both the faculty and students.

From the NAAB Conditions for Accreditation for

Professional Degree Programs in Architecture, 2004 Edition

Fundamental Values 
Optimism -- ensuring an expectation for a sustainable, healthy and better built environment and world

Respect -- ensuring compliance with the TTU Statement of Ethical Principles which states that the University is "committed to the recognition of differences between individuals, the inherent dignity of all individuals, and the elimination of discrimination", we encourage an environment of mutual respect between and among our faculty, students, and staff, and a tolerant attitude for each individual's work, intellectual diversity, methods, and differences, and recognition of the values of both theory and practice. Critical comments about another faculty's teaching pedagogy and assignments are not appropriate in the presence of students. Respect includes discretion when discussing other faculty members, especially with students.

Sharing -- encouraging a sharing and questioning of ideas and knowledge through a collaborative and interdisciplinary environment between and among our students and faculty

Engagement -- ensuring a commitment to and eager participation in the studio environment

Innovation -- promoting innovative teaching and learning methods which enhance critical thinking and design skills within a studio setting

To maintain these values each of us must have a clear understanding of our shared responsibilities.

Studio Etiquette 
Faculty and students should maintain an environment that is clean, quiet, and conducive to working individually and in teams, to listening to the instructor and to other students, and to mutual respect.

Time Management 
The college supports its students, staff and faculty in leading balanced lives. Students are expected to work intelligently and efficiently, though not necessarily longer, in the studio. The college discourages staying up all night as counterproductive and unhealthy. Time management is included as a learning outcome in the freshmen introductory course "Design, Environment and Society" and the enhancing of this skill should be encouraged throughout all studio coursework.

Learning Assessment 
Learning outcomes, policies and assessment methods should be clearly stated in every syllabus. Students are urged to work with faculty to judge when work is substantially complete. Students are entitled to assessment and feedback throughout the semester as this is an integral part of the studio environment. Faculty members have the responsibility and the right to provide criticism and assessment of each student's work and, as such, it is not a violation of studio culture to do so.

Reviews 
Critique is an inherent part of the assessment process in design education. Desk critiques and pin-ups are the most common forms of review. All studio participants are encouraged to exchange ideas, opinions and experiences in a collegial manner.

Formal reviews in a public setting are fundamental to architecture education. This is a unique opportunity for students to communicate ideas through oral and visual presentations. Participation of students, academic faculty, professionals, and community members is expected in public design reviews.

Internal and external design reviews are held at the completion of each semester by the faculty for the benefit of reviewing the program. Students may or may not be required to be present during this review process.

Documentation 
Documentation of the work completed by the students during the semester is important for the student, the faculty and the college. Printed presentations are necessary and required for end-of-semester reviews in the COA and may be included in student portfolios. Digital documentation is a significant way to archive student work and portfolios. Faculty may require both forms of documentation as a part of any design studio.

Administrative Review of the Policy 
Studio Culture is one section of the College of Architecture Policy Manual. As such it is subject to review every three years by a task force of faculty and students appointed by the dean.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
It is the aim of the faculty of Texas Tech University to foster a spirit of complete honesty and a high standard of integrity. The attempt of students to present as their own any work that they have not honestly performed is regarded by the faculty and administration as a serious offense and renders the offenders liable to serious consequences, possibly suspension.
The instructor in a course is responsible for initiating action for dishonesty or plagiarism that occurs in his or her class. In cases of convincing evidence of or admitted academic dishonesty or plagiarism, an instructor should take appropriate action. Before taking such action, however, the instructor should attempt to discuss the matter with the student. If cheating is suspected on a final exam, the instructor should not submit a grade until a reasonable attempt can be made to contact the student, preferably within one month after the end of the semester. See the section on "Academic Conduct" in the Code of Student Conduct for details of this policy.

"Scholastic dishonesty" includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, falsifying academic records, misrepresenting facts, and any act designed to give unfair academic advantage to the student (such as, but not limited to, submission of essentially the same written assignment for two courses without the prior permission of the instructor) or the attempt to commit such an act. 

"Cheating" includes, but is not limited to, the following:

Copying from another student's test paper. 
Using materials during a test that have not been authorized by the person giving the test. 
Failing to comply with instructions given by the person administering the test. 
Possessing materials during a test that are not authorized by the person giving the test, such as class notes or specifically designed "crib notes." The presence of textbooks constitutes a violation only if they have been specifically prohibited by the person administering the test. 
Using, buying, stealing, transporting, or soliciting in whole or part the contents of an un-administered test, test key, homework solution, or computer program. 
Collaborating with or seeking aid or receiving assistance from another student or individual during a test or in conjunction with an assignment without authority. 
Discussing the contents of an examination with another student who will take the examination. 
Divulging the contents of an examination, for the purpose of preserving questions for use by another, when the instructor has designated that the examination is not to be removed from the examination room or not to be returned to or kept by the student. 
Substituting for another person, or permitting another person to substitute for oneself to take a course, a test, or any course-related assignment. 
Paying or offering money or other valuable thing to, or coercing another person to obtain an un-administered test, test key, homework solution, or computer program, or information about an un-administered test, test key, homework solution, or computer program. 
Falsifying research data, laboratory reports, and/or other academic work offered for credit. 
Taking, keeping, misplacing, or damaging the property of the university, or of another, if the student knows or reasonably should know that an unfair academic advantage would be gained by such conduct. 
"Plagiarism" includes, but is not limited to, the appropriation of, buying, receiving as a gift, or obtaining by any means material that is attributable in whole or in part to another source, including words, ideas, illustrations, structure, computer code, other expression and media, and presenting that material as one's own academic work being offered for credit. Any student who fails to give credit for quotations or for an essentially identical expression of material taken from books, encyclopedias, magazines, Internet documents, reference works or from the themes, reports, or other writings of a fellow student is guilty of plagiarism.

Collusion" includes, but is not limited to, the unauthorized collaboration with another person in preparing academic assignments offered for credit or collaboration with another person to commit a violation of any section of the rules on scholastic dishonesty.

Falsifying academic records; includes, but is not limited to, altering or assisting in the altering of any official record of the university, and/or submitting false information or omitting requested information that is required for or related to any academic record of the university. Academic records include, but are not limited to, applications for admission, the awarding of a degree, grade reports, test papers, registration materials, grade change forms, and reporting forms used by the Office of the Registrar. A former student who engages in such conduct is subject to a bar against readmission, revocation of a degree, and withdrawal of a diploma.

Misrepresenting facts to the university or an agent of the university includes, but is not limited to, providing false grades or resumes; providing false or misleading information in an effort to receive a postponement or an extension on a test, quiz, or other assignment for the purpose of obtaining an academic or financial benefit for oneself or another individual; or providing false or misleading information in an effort to injure another student academically or financially.

As per College and University policy, plagiarism may result in an "F" grade for the semester.

COURSE POLICIES
Office hours are for your benefit. If you have questions regarding assignments or any other concerns about the class please feel free to schedule a meeting during your instructor's office hours.

All assignments are due at the beginning of class on the day specified on the attached class schedule. Assignments submitted late without prior knowledge of the instructor, GA/SA will receive an F. Late assignments will only be accepted with prior written permission from your Graduate/Undergraduate Assistant, or, in the case of an emergency, telephone permission followed by a written statement, or with proper documentation as required by current University policy. However, any late submission grade will be reduced by at least one letter grade as a penalty for being late.

EYE PROTECTION
Per OP60.10 in the TTU Operations Manual, all architecture students must use eye protection (goggles) when using Xacto knives or other sharp objects. In addition, these must be disposed of in appropriate containers clearly marked as containing "sharps ". See the following for more information: http://www.depts.ttu.edu/opmanual/OP60.10.pdf 

ATTENDANCE POLICY
ARCH 1311 meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30-4:50PM, in the Media and Communication Building Room 067. The college supports the definition of four absences as being excessive and constitutes cause for having the student drop the class or receive a grade of F. You, the student, must bear the responsibility for keeping track of your own attendance. Absence policies are described on page 50-51 of the University Catalog. 

Students in the college are expected to attend all scheduled class meeting times and activities (lectures & lab/studio sessions). Absences in excess of those stipulated in each individual course syllabus will result in an F. Refer to the university's policy, procedures, and dates on dropping a course. See your academic advisor for additional information.

Absence due to officially approved trips: The Texas Tech University Catalog states that the person responsible for a student missing class due to a trip should notify the instructor of the departure and return schedule in advance of the trip. The student may not be penalized and is responsible for the material missed.

Department chairpersons, directors, or others responsible for a student representing the university on officially approved trips should notify the student's instructors of the departure and return schedules in advance of the trip. The instructor so notified must not penalize the student, although the student is responsible for material missed. Students absent because of university business must be given the same privileges as other students (e.g., if other students are given the choice of dropping one of four tests, then students with excused absences must be given the same privilege).

CLASSROOM CIVILITY 
Students are expected to assist in maintaining a classroom environment that is conducive to learning. In order to assure that all students have the opportunity to gain from time spent in class, unless otherwise approved by the instructor, students are prohibited from engaging in any form of distraction. Inappropriate behavior in the classroom shall result, minimally, in a request to leave class. Students whose behavior is in conflict with maintaining an environment conducive to learning during a lecture class or discussion section will be asked to leave the classroom. Re-admittance is at the instructor "s discretion. 

SUGGESTED READINGS
See Electronic Reserve: 
Electronic Reserve Required Readings 

PRINT RESOURCES
The College of Architecture has very good printing resources. See: http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Print Bureau However there are about 800 architecture students enrolled and all of them typically have some printing to do. So plan ahead. especially during midterm and at the end of the semester check out printing hours and don't wait until last minute to print your work.

SHOP USE
During time of the semester you will most likely use the ARCHITECTURE SHOP http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Shop in room 03 on the courtyard level of the College of Architecture Building. Prior to entering the shop, it is mandatory that you:

Read the TTU-College of Architecture-Shop Rules on the Web.
http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Shop procedures
 

COMPUTER REQUIERMENTS /PRINTING RESOURCES:
CoA Freshmen Computer Requirements http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Computer_Requirement
 
Print and sign the page: -TTU-COA- Health and Safety Statement "
http://arch.ttu.edu/w/images/d/d9/2010_Shop_Release_Form.pdf
 

Bring the signed release form to Mike West in room 05 of the Architecture Building (AH) and obtain from here a sticker on your current student I.D. card

TOBACCO AND AEROSOL USE
Smoking or other uses of tobacco, the use of spray paint or aerosol products of any kind are not permitted anywhere in the Architecture Building. There is a designated smoking area outside in the courtyard near the bridge. The stairwells are not to be used for smoking or painting.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND ACCESS TO FACILITIES 
"The University is committed to the principle that in no aspect of its programs shall there be differences in the treatment of persons because of race, creed, national origin, age, sex, or disability, and that equal opportunity and access to facilities shall be available to all. If you require special accommodations in order to participate, please contact the instructor. Students should present appropriate verification from Student Disability Services Office, 335 West Hall Telephone: 806 742-2405. No requirement exists that accommodations be made prior to completion of this approved University process."

© Copyrights for website, syllabus, assignments, lecture outlines, and calendar created and maintained by Urs Peter "Upe" Flueckiger, College of Architecture, Texas Tech University.